Tag Archives: Pentax conversion kit

Pentax 6×7 Panoramic Conversion Kit

Well, I finally got a full roll of pictures. It has been quite a struggle. This is not easy. There are so many things to keep track of.  Basically, I am learning to use the Vivitar 2800 flash by shooting 35mm film in my Pentax 6×7 camera.

400 T-Max 24 exposure 35mm film shot with the Panoramic Conversion Kit
400 T-Max 24 exposure 35mm film shot with the Panoramic Conversion Kit

A little bit of the film was cut off on the left side where it stuck out of the film can. That bit was narrow and I did a but join to film leader using scotch tape. The right end was also cut off the part attached to the film spool that was inside the can.

There are 13 pictures. All of them came out. I can tell which numbers are which because I put boxes of film into each shot, one more in each. At least until I got to number 8 and then the numbering got messed up.  It looks like it could be possible to get 14 but hey this is good for now.

A bulk film loader would save some money in the long run if I loaded my own film cans. Then I’d be able to get that last frame for sure. Just roll a little more film out. They are sold new and film is sold in 100 foot cans.

35mm panoramic Pentax 6x7 in a Print File Archival Preserver 35-7B4
35mm panoramic Pentax 6×7 in a Print File Archival Preserver 35-7B4

This is why I would want to have 14 shots, they all would fit into one page. That is unlike normal 6×7 negatives. They fit 8 or 9 to a page and there are 10 negatives to a roll.

Adding leader to 24 exposure 35mm film is not needed. Just load 36 exposure film and use the extra film as leader. Sure it wastes film but it is easy to do. If, however, you are like me, you will want to shoot those extra images. Add leader to the 36 exposure roll and get extra shots. How many? I don’t know yet. I just got new film from Freestyle. Two Print File Archival pages will be needed for sure.

First Light

The Pentax 6×7 was used on a human being. The flash was used and so was the panoramic conversion kit. 400 T-Max 35mm film, old, was used in the 120 sized film camera to take a flash picture at 1/125 of a second. A 90mm, f2.8 Leaf Shutter lens was used. A Vivitar 2800 flash unit was used. Automatic was set on the flash, Red was used. Distance was 11 feet for focus.  F4 was used. The flash was used without any panel in it, and it was pointed straight out or on 0. The lens was used on “U” for usual. The camera speed dial was put on 8. Bam.  I got a picture.

Since the film was so old, it was rated at 100 ISO on the flash to try to get more light. And since it was so light after developing two other times more time was given for development, 12 minuets in this case. That did darken the negative a little bit. More light is needed though.

Here are the results:

39-whatever, 14?
39-whatever, 14?
Cropped as is
Cropped as is
Contrast added in the computer
Contrast added in the computer

A new video all about accessories for the Pentax 6×7 was made.

Pentax 6×7 accessories

Pentax 6×7 Flash Photography

Pentax 6x7 camera with a chimney finder + diopter, a 2x teleconverter, the 90mm leaf shutter lens, and a Vivitar 2800 flash, on a wooden handle.
Pentax 6×7 camera with a chimney finder + diopter, a 2x teleconverter, the 90mm leaf shutter lens, and a Vivitar 2800 flash, on a wooden handle.

The teleconverter was not used for the photos shown below, otherwise all you’d see would be the Dragon and a few books.

Well I have to say that this was a bit complicated to use. It was difficult to see indoors enough to focus properly through the normal light meter viewfinder and a f4 lens. The chimney waist level viewfinder helped. The 90mm LS f2.8 lens helped even more. But I still had difficulties. So, I used a huge flashlight to illuminate my subject brightly when I focused, then it was turned off. That worked great. A 45mm f4 lens had been used to get that wide view in the panoramic 35mm conversion kit installed on the 6×7 camera and it has a very shallow depth of field.

The booklets for the flash and the LS lens were scanned and printed so I could read them. I now have great files to print from if any need exists. The internet was scoured for postings about how to do flash photography with a leaf shutter lens.

Then, I decided to start shooting film just using the camera and the flash, no leaf shutter lens needed. The flash has many settings to experience. The camera shutter speed is set on the “X” and the flash is plugged into the “X” port.

Bounce flash with or without the wide angle panel on the flashgun worked the best. No hot spots resulted that way. The Manual setting between the red dot and the blue dot was used mostly. The lens had to be wide open so critical focusing was an issue. The camera was held on my lap to steady it. 1/30 of a second was all that could be used.

Roll 37 #4 negative, Bounced flash, Red Automatic, f4, X speed, 12' focus,45mm lens, The auto check was used.
Roll 37 #4 negative, Bounced flash, Red Automatic, f4, X speed, 12′ focus,45mm lens, The auto check was used, 60 degree bounce angle.

After I got all that out of my system, I put the leaf shutter lens on the camera and had a go at learning to use it with the flash. Now the flash cable had to be moved from the camera body out to the end of the lens and plugged in there.

The lens has a lot of options and settings. It can be used normally without the leaf shutter. It can be used with the leaf shutter. It can make multiple exposures. It can make leaf shutter only very stable shots that bypass the mirror slap on the camera. Mirror up does not work. But leaf shutter alone is way better.

A new roll of film was needed because only 9 pictures were had from the first roll of 35mm. There was black and white leader created but no pictures. I eventually added it to the third roll. I forgot to add it to the second one.

The lens was used with the leaf shutter, starting at the end of the instructions, setting the camera on “T” between x & 1000, the lens on “S” under the front, and the shutter on 1/250.

The flash was set on Red Automatic, the wide angle panel was installed on the flash head, no angle was used and the flash pointed right at the subject, the Dragon, f2.8 was used for the iris opening. The S&U switch under the front of the lens tripped the shutter. It had to be cocked first! Then, the camera shutter speed dial had to be moved to 1000 to get it to lower the mirror and complete the cycle so I could wind the film.

Ugh.

That’s a lot of monkeying around. Here is the photo. With the hot spot included.

90mm ls lens on f2.8 at 1/250 second with direct flash on Red automatic
Roll #38 #9 negative. 90mm ls lens on f2.8 at 1/250 second with direct flash on Red automatic

 

Pentax 6×7 Panoramic 35mm film adapter

This adapter was included with the camera that I purchased. It can be found on the internet easily and it is sold in Amazon and on E-Bay. It isn’t expensive.

Be sure to get the one that has two black view screens. One goes in the camera and one goes under the viewfinder.

What it does is allow you to use 35mm film in the Pentax 6×7, 120 film camera. The photo shown here is scanned at 1200 dpi and is really huge if you have a big computer screen and a fast connection.

You can actually see the sheet music on the negative. It can be burned on when printing.
You can actually see the sheet music on the negative. It can be burned on when printing.

It comes with two view screens and four metal nubs. Two are long and two are short. The long ones go on top and the short ones go on the bottom inside the camera.

A strip of film has to be attached to film in the spool, then that is wound into the spool before loading.

The other end of the added leader goes onto a salvaged take up spool. I’ve cut the leader film end to load into the slot. Another way is to copy how the manufacturer did it.  If using tape, the film should stop short of the spool like it is on a used spool.

A spare 35mm negative holder was modified to accept this long format. I bought a small hacksaw but should have bought a coping saw, anyway,  I have a drill press so the ends were drilled then bent out and filed. It is rough but can be perfected later.

I’m anxious  to print some big prints!

this film is too close to the spool
this film is too close to the spool
Partially loaded
Partially loaded
This old 400 T-Max film is used to learn how to use a flash and leaf shutter lens
This old 400 T-Max film is used to learn how to use a flash and leaf shutter lens