Regular 8mm Film Making

I have been shooting and processing Regular 8mm movie film. Here is one frame from a sync sound film.

Fomapan R-100
Fomapan R-100

Why Regular 8mm? The camera, a Bolex H8-REX4 outwardly is identical to 16mm Bolex cameras. So, learn to shoot on economical  8mm film and then you can use more expensive 16mm film later. The camera is cheaper, too.

Regular 8mm film is the same width as 16mm film. There are twice the perforations on 8mm as on 16mm. Regular 8mm film has 80 frames to the foot and 16mm film has 40 frames to the foot. Regular 8mm film is exposed one half at a time. The film is slit in half. You get twice the frames, twice. One-hundred feet of Regular 8mm film will last as long as 400 feet of 16mm film.

A 400 foot magazine on a Bolex H16-REX is HUGE. But not as huge as a 1200 foot magazine on a 16mm Auricon camera. I had one of those. That is the usual size, 1200 feet or 1000 feet depending on the camera. Several 400 foot magazines, with motors, are needed to shoot 16mm film professionally.

How good is Regular 8mm? See for yourself above. I had a 2K scan made and a test of the 4K scanning. The image is the same, only larger. It fills up a monitor more the larger the scan gets. It is like using a larger movie screen and moving the projector back farther away from it to enlarge the image.

http://www.cinematography.com/index.php?showtopic=70725

There is new color negative film for sale. There are movies on the web about them. The samples are astonishingly sharp, clear, bright, and lacking defects of any kind. Regular 8mm film is steadier than Super 8mm film most of the time.

Regular 8mm Bolex cameras have all manual things to set. There are no automatic anything on Bolex H8 cameras. A light meter is used which must be hand held. Many 16mm cameras are like that. Super 8mm cameras are mostly automatic. Manual settings are an afterthought on them. Exposures are automatic. A 16mm camera like that costs a fortune.

I shoot reversal black and white regular 8mm film and have it scanned for digital editing, sound synchronization,  and Blue-Ray disk final products.

This is a picture of the camera I use.

Bolex H8-REX4

It is a Bolex H8-REX4.