Zeiss Ikon Cameras

Novar Anastigmat f3.5
Novar Anastigmat f3.5

Novar little door

Tessar f3.5
Tessar f3.5
Rangefinder in Meters
Rangefinder in Meters

The Tessar camera had a broken shutter and was sent to an expert to fix it. The Novar Anastigmat had a hole in the bellows made by the  person who scratched the inner lens retaining ring I suppose and who removed the focus stop on the front so that the lens now comes off! I got it to work anyway. Glad to have it.

A few things were learned since I started using Zeiss Ikon cameras since the first one, a Nettar f6.3. There are different lenses and shutters made for this line of cameras. Now I have faster lenses, f4.5 and f3.5 and a better shutter, Compur-Rapid. The 400 speed needs some force to set the spring but it works. Do not change it after setting that spring unless you trip the shutter first.  Zeiss Ikon cameras have a little door over the film counter window. That is needed with thinner backing paper and fast film nowadays. There is a very tiny screw covering the cable release socket on the outer rim of the better shutter. Some cameras focusing scale are in meters and some are in feet, the Zeiss cameras I have, 4 of them, are all in meters.  I had to buy a new, old, rangefinder that was in meters to use. And it is such a good device I just had to have one. Tiny, but worth it. I have another one that is in feet and I missed the focus here and there. Now I know better. The timer works on my Telma shutter f6.3 Zeiss Ikon camera, but the camera  does not have that little door on the back. Compur-Rapid shutters have a timer on them, too. I thought the button was a flash contact. If it is pulled towards the back of the camera you can cock the shutter further, setting the spring. Cool! Neat-o! Wonderful! I never knew that.

The Tessar camera came back from the repair expert fixed and ready to use. The shutter and the timer now work. A handy shutter speed guide was provided; 1/400=1/300 otherwise all is as it should be. The f3.5 Tessar lens is super clean now. Everything works. Today, October 14, 2015, is gray and overcast. It may be a perfect low contrast day for a high contrast film like Tri-x 400 developed normally. I think I’ll rate it at 200 and develop normally to get more detail in dark areas… Bracket anyway.

As it turned out I didn’t go out, but I thought about it. I didn’t want to take all that stuff. I usually go out with a camera, a tiny  notebook, pen, light meter, bag to carry it all, not often but sometimes a tripod, a bushing or two so the tripod fits into the camera, and a cable release. That is a lot.

The Sunny Sixteen Rule is better to take in my head and the camera in my back pocket. If the day was heavily overcast, what would that be on the camera settings? 400 speed film would be 1/400 at f16 for brilliant sun, f11 Cloudy Bright, f8 Hazy, f5.6 Overcast, f4 Heavily Overcast or open shade. So I’d need to use 1/200 at f5.6 mostly since the 400 setting is only 1/300. And if I wanted to shoot at 200 ASA then it would be one stop more light to lighten the shadows or to darken shadows on the negative. That would be 1/100 sec at f5.6.

I like to measure the light with an incident light meter and take notes. That way I can figure out the best settings when I look at the darkroom proof sheets. The contact sheets made with chemicals, not a scanner.

That range finder needs to be adjusted. It is way off.

Here is a photo I took Oct 15, 2015 with this camera. It needs a lens hood or better shading of the lens but otherwise it performed well.

A lens hood would help. I like this view.
A lens hood would help. I like this view.